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of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal s
an education or serve in our military. but i think we're going to be on that comprehensive. >> better than a 50% chance you have a comprehensive solution? >> i think. so i think there is going to be a subject of a lot of debate and discussion and we're going to need the scholars at the prom today and folks to help us think through this, do you take it as a series or comprehensive bill. >> i think it's hard to take an issue on which a lot of people agree and get action on it unless there's trust that some of the other issues that are maybe have less consensus have trust those issue also also get addressed. that's one of the reasons comprehensive immigration reform is attractive to ensure all the immigration issues get addressed at once. it's a reason that the senator's start up 2.0 bill is attractive is because it sees other issues. i want to pose another way that you could view the highly educated immigrant as part of a larger issue and that the non-instruction for our own students. what i see happening in many of the stitesths states and a greatly renude emphasis in why american students are n
for expanding and creating new visa programs for graduates and that is a goal that isporby the higher education association. including the ciation of higher universities. i also want to take this opportunity to thank senator warrer in because he has supported this immigration also introducing the starp-up agent. it was introduced in 2013 to create a new stem visa that foreign students who graduate with a masters or hpped can receive a green card or -- p.h.d. and stay in this country. to pass legislation that expands opportunities for our stem graduates. if we don't, our national competitive horizon has just narrowed. >> senator? >> thank you, alan let me thank my friends, participants on this panel, the miller center for asking me. let me add my two cents as well on mark kaplan who has been a good friend for a long time. he shows clean living, 96 years olan several years o marriage. i think it is particularly aproper of the miller center to ask me to be here, talk about this topic, since my baurp efforts on fixing the debt and deficit have been so successful. this issue tonight, is tied to debt
. we're the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the work force, the 21st-century jobs. that is what we get from higher education to work force training, the real obstacle and the income growth right now is having the best education systems. where we are producing the workers of the 21st century. second, we keep the bridges open and hopefully functional and rebuilt. we represent environmental policies to keep our water clear and take on the environmental challenges that we're facing. it is where the rubber hits the road that we need to get the results. we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets understand that they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with a vision on education, on ensuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force for the jobs that aring with created, so we can be the job creators and we see incomes rise on our constituent. that is what voters judge you by. when we come out and talk to candidates we go for job creators, folks who are going to create jobs in this
like trying to improve the education system. the fund mental things are what we need to work on. not just that we are growing faster in 2013 but for many years thereafter. >> christine, you make the point all the time. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at the numbers and compare the average to those with college degree, it's half. the unemployment rate is half. >> i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. they have a degree, student debt. they're not in the labor market yet. the first job you have. the first foot on. the first foot on the ladder is so important to lifetime achievement. it's a country eating your young. good education but there is an opportunity for the education once you get into the labor market. >> christine, diane, ken. thanks for joining us. good conversation about the jobs report. let's see what the future holds in terms of jobs. all right. does this man scare you? if you're a republican in congress the answer is probably yes. in the last three weeks, more lawmakers have said they are don
thing. there are possibly other things which are trickier, like trying to improve the education system, but sort of these fundamental things, what we need to work on. not just that we're growing a little faster in 2013, but for many years there after. >> christine, you make this point all the time, actually. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at these numbers and compare the average to those with a college degree. it's half. the unplace of employment rate is half. >> it is, but i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. so they've got a degree, debt, they're not in the labor market yet, so they haven't been able to get into that group that has half the employment of everything else. they're having a tough time and as we know, that first job you have, that first foot on the first rung -- >> those sort, up to the age of 30 is higher. up to 11. >> that first step on the ladder is so important to your lifetime earnings, achievement. as a country, it's eati ining y if you can't figure out a good edge kax, but there's an opp
and sergei together based on their education at a higher level to create google in private industry, if you want to declare the garage as private industry. to me sitting here google is sort of the epitome of the way all those forces come together to create what i think of innovation now, and that is what larry page said when you first apply to google, one of the things you have to learn rightway is his line is, he wants you to have all the people at googling a healthy disregard for the impossible. and that is something particularly after coming out of government, i really took me a while to shift my brain to work that way. let me answer the question in two ways in terms of innovation and i do want to bring it back to what president faust was talking about. what concerns me so greatly when i am allowed to stand on the precipice of a company that is constantly creating and innovating because of this healthy disregard they have for the impossible, like google, when i'm working with entrepreneurs and venture capitalists who also invest in that notion of no guarantees, but a sterling ride, in wo
security, improving education, particularly k-12 education, which the american public in this poll said is fundamentally important for a competitive nation and for the success of our next generation. they want solutions. they're very hopeful, but they want solutions. they want leaders to compromise. in this poll, as in all, a majority of both parties said their leadership should compromise with the opposition even if it means they accept the policies they do not agree with and if that means some policies around which they decided to vote for the presidential candidate of their choice. consistent with what everything we have been hearing and reading, they do rank debt and the deficit very highly as a priority for elected officials to get done, to compromise, and get to work. they also made it very clear what they have made clear in every one of our previous 14 polls, and they want the debate be connected to their real life and to things they needed to survive in the economy. the kitchen table discussion is important to them, so those priorities are poured to their mind, and they want goo
part in a form on how education and innovation can benefit the us economy. the google vice president also participates. the center for american progress host the line -- live event i'm a tomorrow on c-span. >> this week, crystal wright, editor and publisher of the internet blog site, >> crystal wright, why did you call your blog "conservative black chick." >> not a big story behind that. i felt it illustrated who i was. it is literal and fun. i was at a reunion for my all-- alma mater. a good friend of mine said i should just do my own blog. >> when did you start? >> 2009. i started blogging in 2009. i was very frustrated by barack obama's election. he ran as a moderate democrat. to pull people in the red state of virginia turn blue, i said, this is interesting. in january, he began to make his appointments and i began to see the same faces of the clinton administration. i became increasingly frustrated. obamacare is what hit me over the edge. i said, why is this president not focusing on job creation? people do not want universal health care rig
education and for education. if government does that and create some certainty, tell us what it will be. with respect to health care costs and energy costs. and then i think it will create the conditions under which businesses will be able to create a renaissance of american competitors. i think that is a brilliant agenda. i think we have agreed that as the distinguished alumnus of harvard said washington as a town with northern charm and southern efficiency. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, corporate tax reform, and investments. emigration, you're not doing the dramatic. vietor due to comprehensive immigration but we did not have a chance to do it. both wings cayman decided it would sabotage it. maybe republicans learned the lesson but i am not sure how much of a lesson. the way that was financed was through the corporate tax increase but there -- that had people on both sides will in to work with the white house and congress. when you talk about infrastructure spending and investments in things we have done with nih, all the talk now is about death. >-- how do
on the really important things that make a difference from job creation. we are the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the workforce of 21st century jobs. that is what democratic governors get. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they hav
is not sexy anymore and family is not sexy anymore. the numbers are bearing this out. we have education gaps. i am talking about black americans now. overall, you just highlighted 40% of babies born out of wedlock. that is really what it is. let's not sugarcoat it. you are not doing kids a favor or our country a favor. >> how do you change that? >> by talking about -- when i grew up, teachers could talk about traditional family values and not be accused of being non- politically correct. it sounds very basic. i do not understand why, on a very fundamental level, why are we not talking to little kids about family? maybe the family is changing a little bit, the face of it, but why can we not talk about family? also, sex education. we need to bring that back in public schools. i remember learning about the biology of the body and the birds and bees in middle school. it was reinforced at home. if we are going to talk about sex education, we should also talk about abstinence. there is a great way not to get pregnant -- not to have sex. there is nothing wrong with abstinence. >> let's go back to y
. joining me this morning is meg, the president of the national education association of virginia. we also have national nea representative dennis roikle with us as well. thank you for coming in so early this morning. >> good to be here. >> i want to start with you. overing picture, -- overarching picture, what is the big picture? what can we stand to lose because of the cliff? >> if nothing is double, it will be across the -- is done, it will be across the board cuts that translates into $4.8 billion. it will impact nine million kids, including 80,000 in head start. it will take a million dollars out of special education and we'll do awfully those cuts to kids and education so the wealthiest 2% of americans can have a tax cut. doesn't make sense. >> you're talking about spending on the federal level. you have to think about the money flowing through local coffers. fairfax county, the biggest school district in our region but a lot of people at home might be surprised that a quarter of kids are on reduced or free lunches. can they get by without those? >> they can't. when we look at the cu
for us. if you will do something on stem education, qualified members help us identify companies from understanding of their home markets. we work with local chambers, members of congress, and we have developed a network of convenience, local business leaders better interested in participating and know how to recruit people. so far we are brought more than two thousand people to the white house this year alone representing more than 500 towns and cities, probably around 1800 companies. out of 10 our ceo's. two out of 10 are investors. host: scott. georgia. republican. caller: i may health insurance broker and i have a couple of the employees and a comment on the aca. i agree and something had to be done on health care costs, but this will just add fuel to the fire. part of the provisions that have yet to come into effect, one of which requires the highest ratio from three-to-one, that is your lowest rate cannot be any higher than three times your lowest rate. so, if you have a 64-year-old and a 19-year-old, you can not charge the real cost because the risk factors for a 19-year-old ar
identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by leading them to a path of self- determination. >> it is the mayor's youth employment program. the mayor has made a commitment to employ as many youth as possible. that is something that we hope will help. i want to thank all of our panelists today. give them a round of applause. [applause] >> the way we structured this panel, a short presentation to introduce the topic of neuroscience. then we will go to ask questions of all the different members. [applause] >> thank you very much for that kind introduction, for the invitation. i am a narrow scientists. i studied your -- i am a new row scientist. i study your brain. what neuroscience might have to offer in terms of understanding indivi
to do effective voter education and so until we address that, that systemic issue, they can you're going to continue to see things over and over again. you know, if you want to -- something that is a little bit kind of absurd situation, in galveston, texas, there were 39 polling places that opened in the afternoon because they didn't give enough time to turn the machines on and let them warm up and the judge had to extend polling place hours. so simple things that impact voters in an area. that was something that was surprising to us. or the high number of provisional ballots where they didn't have the right registration information. then you had, especially in predominantly african-american precincts, voters who were showg up and they were given provisional ballots. and there were so many provisional ballots, there were some voter had to walk away. and that shouldn't happen in this country. >> a great example. >> we had a great voter protection team headed by bill bauer and court in the, and we had a good system to track. so just break down what we saw on election day. 32% of the issues
is given the economy of prince george's county, the education level and the demographics of prince george's county, here's the question. is this the best that prince george's county has to offer when it comes to public service? >> i can't believe that it is. on one hand, i just think that people need to step up. and get involved. so that you don't have to make a choice between two individuals like this. >> well, the governor will and can now choose someone else. and mr. hall has indicated he may appeal the decision. >> and that's his right to appeal. >> he also has a right to run. >> he has a right to run for office, should he choose to. >> the brother of former d.c. chair kwame brown, charged with bank fraud. charged with claiming for more income than he earned for a loan modification. that's the same charge that led to kwame brown's resignation as chair after his efforts to buy a boat. this is pretty ironic. >> ironic and unfortunate. >> here again we're talking about public image. although his brother wasn't in public life, but it was related to the brother who was the chair of the d.c
bullying is happening at an alarming rate in higher education. i'm joined now by the book's author, dr. leah hollis. you say 62% of people who work in higher education have experienced bullying versus 45% of the general population. where did you get these numbers? >> i survived 175 schools and found a number of people especially in entry levels and middle management were talking about how they were the target of bullying from the boss or organization in general. >> what's going on, why at colleges and universities? how are bullies protected? >> what's interesting is in a college or university we are trained tore experts in our field to go -- to be experts in our field to go out and increase knowledge. it's also an isolating experience. so now when you have two managed people or collaborators have team be, you've already been protected by tenure and at least in a culture that supports being isolated and supports a big ego. that doesn't always make for the best situations. >> who are saying they're being bullied, younger educator by tenured folks? >> the assistant director or the manager
pornography charges. robert fenn was arrested back in june. he taught special education students. investigators say that the access to child pornography websites. >> of montgomery county office will student charged with bringing on unloaded gun at the school is expected in a hearing today. he went to magruder high school on thursday morning even though he was suspended. an officer told them that he was not supposed to be there. they found a weapon in his back. -- in his bag. >> he used to be a good kid. now bringing a weapon to school, it is just not right. >> abc 7 news but several startling messages on his twitter account. he tweeted, as soon as i stepped in school, it is savage time. >> it will be tough getting around using metro this weekend. here is what you need to know. there will be no red line service between -- shuttle buses will be available. there will be single tracking on the blue number lines. orange line trains will not be running because of work on the yellow line bridge over the potomac river. you can find this all at macy's is pulling out all the stop
is in the budget issue. they think you can balance the budget by cutting. i have seen a lot of educational initiatives go on, but they do not necessarily seem to have any legs. how do we get the american public to understand the debate we had here today? it was a lot more agreement than debate. >> alison and i participated in a fiscal wake up tour. a fiscal solutions tour. now we are doing the next generation of that. we did in september and october of this year. what you have to do is build a burning platform. you have to understand the kinds of polls most politicians listen to our superficial and grossly misleading. when the public is asked, do you want to work longer for social security? do you want to pay higher premiums for medicare? do you want to pay more taxes? what do you expect them to say? my point is, when you build a burning platform case, which can be done in 10 minutes, and i have done it thousands of times, they get it. that is when you get 97% off to be the top priority, 92% agree on the principles, 85% weighted towards the spending, so what does that mean? the biggest def
get an ivy league education for free. but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> we're back at 8:46. what if you could take courses from prestigious universities like princeton, stanford, duke and others for free? well, you can. jamie gangel is in washington to explain how. good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. truly a revelation in education. some of the elite universities are offering these classes, let's say it again, for free. and they are attracting millions of students, include iing a cou who might surprise you. from finance to calculus to poetry. >> let's go to a second passage. >> reporter: world class professors are now offering their courses absolutely free. want to discover your inner passion for emily dickinson? >> her work is done in the realm of possibility. >> reporter: all you need is a computer and internet access. classes are known as massive open online courses or mooc. offered by several start-up companies, the largest and fastest growing is called coursera, the brainchild of these two professors. their goal is to revolutionize education. >> giving us the opp
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
on how best to educate and otherwise care for their children with disabilities, and another provision of the treaty that can be read to obligate the united states government to pay for abortion services. >> you're just interpreting things. it never uses the word abortion, it basically says that disabled people should have the same access to health care that other people have, non-disabled people have overseas, again, we're talking about overseas. >> it does refer to reproductive rights and reproductive rights in this context has been interpreted to include abortion, and this is -- >> interpreted by you. >> -- an interpretation -- yes, and a number of other people who looked at it as well. the point is that if this does mean something, and if it could mean something that could impact u.s. law. >> but this treaty states it's not self-executing. and the u.s. supreme court has said that a non-self executing treaty doesn't create obligations that could be enforced in u.s. federal courts. >> the fact that it may be non-self executing, anderson, doesn't mean that it doesn't have any impact a
of education which the court held it was unconstitutional. so why wait until 1967 to hear the case about interracial marriage. here are all of the states that had laws on the books. banning interracial marriage. by 1967 only 16 states still had the laws on the books. in the decades between 1947 and 1967 the years the supreme court was staying mum on the issue, most states decided on their own. the court was following on their heels, following the heels of public opinion. this is a big debate in the legal world. is the supreme court influenced by american public opinion? these are nine people who could completely ignore the will of the people. they are appointed for life. they can totally ignore us if they choose. many legal experts say that's not how it works. they are swayed by what the people think about issues. they announced they would hear two cases involving same-sex marriage. that's huge. they would hear the prop 8 case out of california. that's the california ballot proposition which amended the california constitution to define marriage between a man and a woman. the court will
shot by the taliban. she was shot at her home in pakistan after campaigning for girl's education. pakistan's president has added his signature to her petition. and hospital officials say that malala is doing quite well. >>> the rapper made famous by his gangnam style dance is apologizing. psy says hess sorry for making anti-american statements at a 2004 performance. the performer says the song lyrics were reactions to the war in iraq and the killing of two korean schoolgirls run over by a u.s. tank. he is scheduled to tape a christmas in washington special tomorrow. >>> a wrong turn leaves a california woman clinging for her life. she was on a routine hike through griffith park when she made one wrong turn. the trail slowly narrowed until the ground beneath her started to crumble. she clung to some vegetation on the trail to keep from falling off on the side. hikers along the correct trail heard her cries for help and called police. >> thank god i'm still alive. i was about to die. >> lucky woman there. crews rescued her by helicopter. she w
? control on cars? they are used in more homicide than guns. we need to amp up our education on certain freedoms and liberties and put larger penalties on those who abuse them, but nick, that is the point. we don't ban cars because they're potentially dangerous, but there are significant controls on their use and ownership. they're registered, licensed and you have to have training. what controls would you accept on the ownership of firearms? i'm just asking. you can answer at that is our report. i'll be right back here at 11:00 along with anita and topper. don't forget. log on any time to have a great evening. we'll talk to you a bit later. bye bye. ♪ "e.t." >>> duchess kate's pregnancy, the prank and the hospital's royal security breach. [ phone ringing ] >> hello, i'm just after my granddaughter kate, i want to see how her little tummy bug is going. >> the fake phone call, pretending to be the queen. the nurse giving out intimate information about kate. >> now, will william and the palace press charges? >> i think it was a pretty poor trick to play
vulnerable and promotes self reliance. it calls for the end of the chronic inequalities in our education system. it promotes economic growth from free enterprise because nothing has done more to lift people everywhere out of poverty. of all people i have ever known, jack kemp did more to personify and personalize this message. every problem does not to support -- disappear from the workings of the free market alone. i would love to say if we just went on the gold standard, it would all be settled. americans are compassionate americans are compassionate people.
and investing in early childhood and investing in science and stem education if you are indifferent to whether or not we reduce our budget deficit by simply taking deeper and deeper cuts in domestic discretionary budget. at some point you skip to a point where you are simply treating of between -- trading off between early to childhood and biomedical research and higher education. those are not trade-offs the american public wants us to make. when we talk about getting our fiscal discipline, our fiscal house in order, i want to remind people that when i was here in the early 1990's, one of the clarion calls, one of the reasons people make that case, was that if we had expanding deficits, it wasn't just that we would crowd out private capital. it was that we would crowd out public investment in the future, in children come in modern infrastructure, and innovation. when we decide we agree to cut spending, which we need to as but in larger deficit reduction. those of you who care about innovation need to care about how you cut, how did this spending. -- how you do spending. we have cut domestic d
was educate latino voters, educationing them on how to vote and how to vote in arizona because we have a mail-in ballot process and a voter i.d. law in place so a lot of organizations were educate latino voters, it may be easier to sign up on the mail-in list so you don't have to deal with identification if you don't have the proper i.d. and choose to vote in person. i think that explains why there were so many mail-in ballots cast in the general election in 2012. >> i want to get back to the senate race but stick with the voter i.d. requirements. talk about the restrictions, what exactly the requirements are, and in particular there's been this discussion at the national level about republicans are using voter i.d. requirements to tamp down on voter turnout from certain areas. what are the concerns? how is the latino population-latino voters in arizona -- how are they dealing with that? are there problems? is there going to be a battle over trying to tight 'the voter i.d. requirements? is it a photo i.d. requirement? >> really quickly. arizona's voter i.d. law was put -- voted on by the citi
educated whites has decreased, decreased by four years. and now the argument is that we can increase the medicare eligibility age to 67 because people are living longer. hello? who is living longer, those who have higher incomes. those who don't, those who work with their hands, whether they are a made cleaning a hotel room, a farmer or a coal miner or any other task which is labor-intensive and physical labor-intensive. by the time they are at 65, their body is broken and to deny them the opportunity, i can tell you everybody i meet who's not 65, wants to live long enough to get to 65 and medicare. and so for our republican friends, their principal negotiator has put on the table, the speaker of the house has put on the table, let's raise the eligibility age. january, you were talking about this earlier. this is a fundamental dichotomy in how we value our seniors, how we value each other, how we are compassionate. ms. jackson lee: can i say one thing and then step away, i'm glad you used the statistic of a white male, because i want this to be holistic. you did it on income. there a
schoolteacher who spent the better part of 40 years educating our children. she deserves and needs to e retire next year. she's 64. i'm here for darlene, a -- [inaudible] native who receives her life saving blood pressure medication through medicare part d. i'm here for alice, an african-american grandmother of ten who receives treatment for her diabetes through medicaid. this woman worked her whole life in the hotel industry. i'm here for my friend mark who owns a small business. he's a construction manager. >> ma'am, ma'am, i'm going to ask you to sit down so we can have this discussion. >> i'm happy to leave -- [inaudible] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> we're gonna vote -- [inaudible] the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! >> okay. i'm gonna take a moment to try to, um, talk, and we'll see if it works. i don't know if other people are here. but i actually think that what we just saw is, um, a true reflection of how hard what we're trying to do is. i'm real
and a passion for public service and education. i am deeply saddened by her passing and know that her legacy of service will live on. yvonne kennedy was born on january 8, 1945, in mobile, alabama, to leroy and thelma kennedy. at a young age she displayed a commitment to academic excellence and upon graduating from high school earned her bachelors degree from alabama state university, a masters degree from morgan state university, and a ph.d. from the university of alabama. these early accomplishments were the beginning of an illustrious career, both as a lawmaker and a community leader. first elected to the alabama state house of representatives in a special election in 1979, dr. kennedy was one of the longest serving members of the alabama state legislature. she served the 97th district of mobile for more than 33 years. she was a prominent lawmaker who fought against alabama's egregious voter i.d. laws and she championed the voter rights for rehabilitated ex-felons. she was the chair of alabama's black caucus and was well respected by her colleagues. her tireless commitment to public servi
and pretend -- not these guys but someone else from the radio station. they're from the board of education and said there was a mistake and she did badly. they had one girl on and put her on a lie detector 14 years old and asked about her sex life. she gets raem upset and turns out she was raped at 12. this sort of thing, object seven at this times and they had a porn star on one sometime. another one is carl sanderson, controversial on the radio station. a female journalist wrote a negative story about her, and et cetera esd he was going to get her. >> what happens to the radio station and these two deejays? is there an investigation? >> scotland yard in britain is investigating, and they've spoken to australian police to pull together their investigation. we expect the coroner's court decision to come out or the coroner to make a statement today, actually. the company -- we have a comment from the company. they say first and foremost we'd like to express our deep and sincere con dolenesss to the family for the lost and we're sorry for what happened. we don't claim to be perfect and we al
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
. beyonce sound like she has a fifth grade education, she can't talk. excuse me, i said i am a fan. we have to call a spade a spade. >> that's what is interesting. she is known for being a straight talker. beyonce does have the documentary coming out. going to show behind the scenes vufz h views of her life, baby blue ivy, business projects. will air february 16 on hbo. beyonce's rep did not comment. and williams decleanined to comment. you know, i love beyonce. some times difficult to understand what she says. she's got that very -- >> i am not going there. you and wendy can go out on the limb. >> i love beyonce. she does have a certain drawl that makes her a little difficult to understand. >> a really uncomfortable moment at a cocktail party one of these days with the two meeting. we love beyonce. >> we do. we do. williams calls it like she sees them. lake i do. >> you got to hand it to her if she is going to disht o it out. dish it to any body. she can take it too. >> she can take it? >> i worked with wendy when she did her radio show. one of her legal eagles. i dished it to her. she cou
retired educators in california who had pensions of more than $100,000 a year, okay. that's 700,000 of them in 2005. in 2011, there were 5,400 retired educators who had pensions of over $100,000 a year. >> greta: california is in deep trouble. >> deep trouble. >> i don't think in this country people are ever going to work towards solving these problems when we do these hits on different people. i mean, this is like the rich are so bad, they're urinating on the poor. >> yeah. >> greta: you know, no matter how we resolve or how we work towards resolving things, when you declare war. >> it's really inflammatory and ataghtattracts a lot of attenti. it was narrated by ed asner, by the way, the liberal actor. it obscures the fact of how wealthy the unions are. from the city journal article, in the last decade, the teachers unions spent more on politics in the last decade than the oil industry and the pharmaceutical industry and the tobacco industry combined. >> greta: don't they worry with the bad situation economically in california, and they're in a really tough situation, don't you
transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." thanks for watching tonight. now, let's put this all into context here. fiscal cliff negotiations, don't you think they wouldç proceed lot faster and smoother if both sides were really dealing with reality? but, you see, the republicans, they simply are not. house speaker john boehner and senate minority leader mitch mcconnell have spent years catering to the base that believes, let's say, president obama's a socialist, and the united nations wants to take your disabled child right out of your home. they have votes to back it up, folks. this pitiful display of most senate republicans on the disability treaty showed once again just how far they are, and how far they are removed from reality. one democratic senator told me yesterday his office was actually getting calls from constituents with disabled children wanting to know if the u.n. would remove their children from thei
achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... they can inspire our students. let's solve this. for a professional cleansing device? join the counter revolution and switch to olay pro-x. get cleansing results as effective as a $200 system. guaranteed or your money back. olay pro-x. [ male announcer ] marie callender's puts everything you've grown to love about sunday dinner into each of her pot pies. tender white meat chicken and vegetables in a crust made from scratch. marie callender's. it's time to savor. >>> welcome back to "the ed show." thanks for watching tonight. now, let's put this all into context here. fiscalff negotiations, don't you think they would proceed a lot faster and smoother if both sides were really dealing with reality? but, you see, the publicans, they simply are not. house speaker john boehner and senate minity ader mitch mcconnell have spent years catering to the base that believes, let's say, president obama's a socialist, and the united nations wants to take your disabled child right out of your home. t
more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back to "hardball." now time for the "sideshow." first, 38 republicans voted this week to defeat a u.n. treaty that promotes rights for disabled citizens worldwide. last night jon stewart took them on. >> i guess it's time for a new segment "please tell me this is rock bottom." it's official, republicans hate the united nations more than they like helping people in wheelchairs. you voted no because your fear is if we sign onto a treaty that is only recommendations for improved disability standards, standards we ourselves made the law of the land in this country 20 years ago, what's to stop the men if blue helmets from storming into your living room -- - i'm sorry, school -- and force you to build a wheelchair accessible ramp to the cafeteria -- i'm sorry, your kitchen. >> and from the tea party right to the liberal left. we had massachusetts congressman barney frank on "hardball" this week for an interview before he departs the congress altogether, but david
of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> here in the united states, we're sitting on titanic amounts of energy that's both cheaper and cleaner than coal or oil, talking about natural gas. but we end up burning off millions of cubic feet of it every day because we don't have enough demand since our government refuses to support embracing nat gas for surface vehicles. while we probably aren't going to use it ourselves, last time we got good news in the form of an important government report commissioned by the department of energy that gave its blessing to the idea of exporting the fuel via liquefied natural gas terminals. it's a positive for the natural gas stocks. maybe the biggest beneficiary, and you might not have thought of it, dominion resources, letter "d." it's a major utility providing electricity to customers in virginia, west virginia, pennsylvania, ohio and north carolina. the company used to have an oil and gas business but sol
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> in 1967 supreme court ruled unanimously that race cannot be used as a basis to restrict marriage. this was a famous case. loving versus virginia. the amazingly named lovings were richard and mildred. in 1958 they travelled to washington, d.c. so they could get married. when they returned to virginia where interracial marriage was against the law, they were sentenced to a year in prison for getting married. when the judge in virginia sentenced them to prison he said "god created the races and placed them on separate continents. he did not intend for the races to mix." the lovings appealed that decision and won at the supreme court. but why did it take until 1967 for the supreme court to weigh in on interracial marriage? by 1954, the court had already ruled in cases involving race and discrimination. the most famous in brown v. board which the court held it was unconstitutional. so
. the most famous in brown v. board of education, which the court held unanimously separate was unconstitutional. so why wait until 1967 to hear the case about interracial marriage. here are all of the states that had laws on the books in 1947 banning interracial marriage. by 1967 only 16 states still had those laws on the books. in the two decades between 1947 and 1967, the years the supreme court was staying mum on the issue, most states decided on their own it was unconstitutional to ban interracial marriage, or at least was. the court was following on their heels, following the heels of public opinion. this is a big debate in the legal world. is the supreme court influenced by american public opinion? these are nine people who could completely ignore the will of the people. they are appointed for life. no election. no culpability. they can totally ignore us if they choose. many legal experts say that's not how it works. supreme court justices are, in fact, swayed by what people in this country think about issues. today the supreme court announced it would hear two cases
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